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A scale is one of the elements that separates a visualization from a picture. Not always easy, especially from an extreme perspective, or if the background of an image is 200 miles away from the foreground.
David McClure elegantly solves this problem by including familiar (to North Americans, at least) objects on a photograph taken from orbit. The solouhette of a six-foot-tall man corresponds to the scale in the foreground (the Agena Target Vehicle), and an outline of Manhattan gives a sense of the size of Isla San Jose and the Baja California Coast.
-RS

A scale is one of the elements that separates a visualization from a picture. Not always easy, especially from an extreme perspective, or if the background of an image is 200 miles away from the foreground.

David McClure elegantly solves this problem by including familiar (to North Americans, at least) objects on a photograph taken from orbit. The solouhette of a six-foot-tall man corresponds to the scale in the foreground (the Agena Target Vehicle), and an outline of Manhattan gives a sense of the size of Isla San Jose and the Baja California Coast.

-RS

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A line chart showing Super Bowl start times between 1967 and 2014. I like the simple annotations and title. See the tweet here.
- AKE
Interesting, and decently designed, but I’d like to see an explanation of why kickoff times bounced around in the 80s (East Coast vs West Coast venues?), and stabilized since 1991.
-RS

A line chart showing Super Bowl start times between 1967 and 2014. I like the simple annotations and title. See the tweet here.

- AKE

Interesting, and decently designed, but I’d like to see an explanation of why kickoff times bounced around in the 80s (East Coast vs West Coast venues?), and stabilized since 1991.

-RS

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Although Dataviz Purists may not support the use of dials, this one, mimicking a car’s speedometer, adds valuable context to the numbers.
-AKE
Sometimes it makes sense to forego precision for a good metaphor.
-RS

Although Dataviz Purists may not support the use of dials, this one, mimicking a car’s speedometer, adds valuable context to the numbers.

-AKE

Sometimes it makes sense to forego precision for a good metaphor.

-RS

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Another exceptional graphic from the Wall Street Journal. The original is located here: https://twitter.com/WSJ/status/429709177926471680
I love the underlying photograph with the circle charts on top. It’s engaging to the everyday reader rather than looking like a boring, scientific chart. 
Although Dataviz Purists won’t support the use of circles in this chart, can you imagine the same visualization with bars instead of circles? It wouldn’t work. 
-AKE

Dataviz purists (like me) will certainly mention that the area of a circle isn’t they best way to convey quantity, but that’s offset by the striking impression of the circles, reminiscent of targets.
-RS

Another exceptional graphic from the Wall Street Journal. The original is located here: https://twitter.com/WSJ/status/429709177926471680

I love the underlying photograph with the circle charts on top. It’s engaging to the everyday reader rather than looking like a boring, scientific chart. 

Although Dataviz Purists won’t support the use of circles in this chart, can you imagine the same visualization with bars instead of circles? It wouldn’t work. 

-AKE

Dataviz purists (like me) will certainly mention that the area of a circle isn’t they best way to convey quantity, but that’s offset by the striking impression of the circles, reminiscent of targets.

-RS

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If you didn’t see the New York Times’ dialect quiz this winter, you must’ve been living under a rock. The quiz and its accompanying heat maps filled my Facebook newsfeed for several weeks. In case you missed it, here’s a link to the quiz: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html?_r=0
The maps were so clear and simple that the focus was on the findings, not on the visualization itself. Here’s my heat map. Even though I grew up in the DC area, can you see the huge impact my South Dakotan parents have had on my speech?
-AKE
Another example of a Color Brewer palette, designed to match how humans perceive color.
-RS 

If you didn’t see the New York Times’ dialect quiz this winter, you must’ve been living under a rock. The quiz and its accompanying heat maps filled my Facebook newsfeed for several weeks. In case you missed it, here’s a link to the quiz: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz-map.html?_r=0

The maps were so clear and simple that the focus was on the findings, not on the visualization itself. Here’s my heat map. Even though I grew up in the DC area, can you see the huge impact my South Dakotan parents have had on my speech?

-AKE

Another example of a Color Brewer palette, designed to match how humans perceive color.

-RS 

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Dataviz cartoons, is there anything better?!
-AKE

Nope.
-RS

Dataviz cartoons, is there anything better?!

-AKE

Nope.

-RS